Classic Aware: you know your car? Prove it.

  • Brand new UK campaign promotes importance of having one’s classic properly maintained
  • Response to government and EU plans for younger classic vehicles to be MoT-exempt
  • Movement backed by CAR SOS presenter Fuzz Townshend
  • Classic Car Weekly readers also inspirational to the campaign  

 

A brand new campaign, Classic Aware, is officially launched today to promote the importance of having one’s classic vehicle inspected and maintained on a regular basis.

Since November 2012, obligatory MoT tests have been scrapped for any vehicle registered prior to 1 January 1960. When the forthcoming EU Roadworthiness Directive becomes active in 2018, a larger number of vehicles may be affected as the Directive calls for 30-year-old (and older) vehicles with no substantial changes made to them, to be given some form of exemption from testing.

Whilst it may not be a legal requirement to have a current MoT on one’s classic, the burden of responsibility falls onto the individual driving the vehicle at the time of any accident and/or offence.

The new campaign intends to encourage classic vehicle owners to take charge by refusing to rely solely on home-checks, but substitute the no-longer compulsory MoT with appropriate safety checks and thorough inspections by independent specialists.

 

Classic Aware’s mission statement: Prove it.

Is your car roadworthy? Prove It.

You only do 1000 Miles A Year? Prove It.

You know your car? Prove It.

 

The new movement has the enthusiastic support of TV presenter, classic car garage owner, Classic Friendly founder and Cherished Cars insurer Carole Nash brand ambassador Fuzz Townshend, who also inspired it, as well as Bauer Media publication Classic Car Weekly and PR consultancy AV PR.

“I am but one of the many voices rising from within the classic car world,” said Fuzz. “Owner inspections might miss crucial clues that affect classic cars more deeply than modern cars (which have more automated safety systems in place); once compulsory testing is removed, there would be very little between the road and some 650,000 cars. Statistically, the government talks about classic cars only being involved in 0.03% of road accidents, but any number of lives lost is significant, and it is only a matter of time before self-regulating, occasional checks take their toll.”

CCW editor Keith Adams is equally vociferous: “we’re opposing the proposed move, in the strongest terms, and I’m hoping the wider industry will, too. Insurers, especially now, should look at the implications, and consider how they can persuade their policy holder to test their cars, regardless of age.”

Whilst there are those who do not oppose plans to make more and more classic cars MoT-exempt, it is clear from CCW readers’ comments that Classic Aware will gather momentum with the public, insurers, the UK media and garages’ support.

Classic Aware has its own dedicated website: www.classicaware.com.